Do We Need the Government to Own Our Homes?

An alarming number of empty nesters, coming to an end of their earning years and facing an unreasonable-never-ending-property-tax burden, are being forced to sell their homes. Property taxes are like mortgage payments, except instead of ending in thirty years, they go on and on and on until death. And how’s this for the ultimate foreclosure—the government can sell our homes if we fail to pay our property taxes on time.

I think conventional wisdom of this generation and past generations was that owning your own home was a failsafe investment. I’m a baby boomer, and I thought if I bought a house and dutifully paid off the mortgage, someday I could own my home. Recently though, a slow realization manifested itself. Here it is: The government owns my home.

As taxes have crept up over the years, I now pay $51,000 a year in property/school taxes. Over the next thirty years (I could reasonably live that long), that would add up to $1,530,000. Apparently, I don’t own my home. Forget that I’ve already been paying school taxes for twenty-five years, I still owe the government $1,530,000. By the time I die, I will actually have paid the government more in property taxes than the value of my home. That’s assuming I could even stay in my home with such a tax burden.

It seems to be a given that we should pay property taxes to support entitlement programs like public education. The premise isn’t horrible—we all pitch in to educate the children whose parents can’t afford to pay for school—part of the American dream—an education for all children. We certainly all benefit from educating our children, because education leads to opportunities. Adults with opportunities are less likely to commit crime, suffer health problems, and are more likely to be productive citizens. (Whether the education system should shift from the government to the private sector is an idea worth our consideration, and putting this into the hands of the private sector could provide a solution to our current problem of unreasonable taxation. At least the private sector would run it without the need to tax us all to/until death to pay for it. If the private sector could provide a higher-quality education, then the idea gets even more interesting.)

But in our current situation, the government administers and controls the education system, and irrespective of the quality of education being provided the government has the absolute power to force us to pay taxes for this our entire lives. Is this reasonable? Is it reasonable that even people who no longer have children in public school and people who never-have-had and never-will-have children in public school are forced to pay this tax? I would never advocate we stop educating our children. I’m just saying it’s time for a long-overdue return to reasonable taxation. Shouldn’t there be a tax okay-that’s-enough point?

The never-ending-property-tax burden in America has become too great. The American Dream of growing old in the home you’ve worked hard to own is just that—only a dream, a fantasy. Are we okay with this?

VN:F [1.9.7_1111]
Rating: 9.8/10 (9 votes cast)
Do We Need the Government to Own Our Homes?, 9.8 out of 10 based on 9 ratings
0saves
If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.
This entry was posted in Taxes and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Do We Need the Government to Own Our Homes?

  1. Danneskjold says:

    “Potentially, a government is the most dangerous threat to man’s rights: it holds a legal monopoly on the use of physical force against legally disarmed victims.”

    -Ayn Rand

    VN:F [1.9.7_1111]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (8 votes cast)
  2. Ricky says:

    Move into a smaller home. The problem is that the rich never want to pay the fair share. They ALWAYS complain about high taxes, no matter how low they go (Bush tax cuts but taxes still too high). Sorry but i don’t feel sad for these people.

    VA:F [1.9.7_1111]
    Rating: 2.1/5 (7 votes cast)
  3. Magnus says:

    Good thinking Ricky, why don’t the rich just move into a smaller home… Hmmm, wonder how the government will makeup for it’s lost revenue if that would happen… Guess they would just raise the rates on your home – dipshit.

    VA:F [1.9.7_1111]
    Rating: 4.6/5 (11 votes cast)
    • Ricky says:

      Or just repeal the billions of bush tax cuts for the rich and leave my home alone. The richest people have like 90% of all the money and still complain…Anyone who feels sorry for the rich must be someone rich or have bought into the Fox propaganda like you.

      VA:F [1.9.7_1111]
      Rating: 1.5/5 (2 votes cast)
      • Caesar Romaine says:

        “Or just repeal the billions of bush tax cuts for the rich and leave my home alone”.

        Yes Ricky – as long as your home is left alone.

        By the way, you may wish to consider from whence you derive the notion of “Bush tax cuts for the richest people” before you bandy about expressions such as “Fox propaganda”.

        VN:F [1.9.7_1111]
        Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)
  4. Danneskjold says:

    “This goes back to the basic understanding of property rights, property and free society should be owned by the people and shouldn’t be regulated to death by the governments whether its Washington D.C. or local governments, right now we really don’t own our land we just pay rent on our land.”

    -Ron Paul

    VN:F [1.9.7_1111]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (6 votes cast)
  5. mcoons_48506 says:

    If we posit that we do in fact need government, which I think most of us do, how should said government be funded? Property taxes mean you never really own your land. It is essentially rented to you by the government. Income taxes are based upon the assumption that all money is the government’s and they are allowing you to keep a portion. A sales tax seems to me the best way to go. I would choose the size of my tax bill, it would be very simple, at least on the individual level, and it would be much harder for lobbyists to get special favors since most of the “crony capitalism” (more correctly fascism) is done through tax credits.

    VN:F [1.9.7_1111]
    Rating: 4.8/5 (6 votes cast)
    • Trey says:

      I think consumption taxes are by far the best option, short of purely voluntary taxes (which would be better yet but politically unfeasible in our lifetime). The only risky thing about consumption taxes are varying rates for different goods and exemptions, which basically lets government pick winners and losers. I read an article recently about how in France, B cup bras are taxed at a different rate than C cup bras, and strap bras a different rate than strapless…

      So, for a consumption tax to work it must be flat across all goods and there must be no exemptions.

      VN:F [1.9.7_1111]
      Rating: 4.8/5 (6 votes cast)
  6. gantiross says:

    these belongings are often called junk.While there is limited space at your home and further will accumulate in time, it would be recommended that you get rid of them.

    Some individuals see discarding old things that happens to be still operational as wasting money.There might be another way to make this happen and make money in addition that is by way of a garage purchase.

    Before an important garage purchase, these items need to be categorized.The chore of segregating is going to be challenging so make sure you set some time to decide if it’s going to kept or perhaps sold.

    In order not to earn a mess from the garage or within the living place, it would be recommended that you buy some cardboard container.Some grocery stores give them away for fre these belongings are often called junk.While there is limited space at your home and further will accumulate in time, it would be recommended that you get rid of them.Some individuals see discarding old things that happens to be still operational as wasting money.There might be another way to make this happen and make money in addition that is by way of a garage purchase.Before an important garage purchase, these items need to be categorized.The chore of segregating is going to be challenging so make sure you set some time to decide if it’s going to kept or perhaps sold.In order not to earn a mess from the garage or within the living place, it would be recommended that you buy some cardboard container.Some grocery stores give them away for free which is usually located in the rear of the facilities.The answer why boxes are needed is because you don’t have telling how much junk is at the attic and the garage.The family members can even scan each and every room for the purpose of things which is part of the sale to help with making the residential roomier.Someone should record the things on some of paper.An inventory may then be compiled in alphabetical structure or by simply product to focus on everything.Just a few examples may very well be clothes, house furniture, toys, kitchenware and linens that are reasons for things that are changed in your own home.The value worth mentioning goods fluctuates so another strategy for categorizing everything is going to be by the price.All the toys which might be 25cents together with below could be in a particular box although linens that are $10 not to mention below for another.If this garage sale is known as a two evening event, the layout within the first day is usually changed to ensure that customers what individuals missed any box can go over it again and perhaps buy an issue.This may reduce any inventory if not that a lot of was sold the afternoon before. Aquiring a garage sale is compared to Macy’s or every other retail avenue selling anything for 50% off of.The household owner should categorize and fold sometimes since you might have a lot of chaos when it’s held in the home.By being prepared along with a little help from best freinds and family, this event can be success..

    VN:F [1.9.7_1111]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>